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Names

Alan Sharp

  • Person
  • 1934-2013
Born in Alyth, Sharp was adopted and raised in Greenock. Leaving school at 14 Sharp did a variety of jobs before moving to London with the intention of writing.
In 1965, his screenplay 'A Knight in Tarnished Armour' was broadcast by the BBC. He also published his first novel 'A Green Tree in Gedd'e', which won the Scottish Arts Council Award in 1967, the same year he published 'The Wind Shifts'.
Sharp emigrated to the USA where he found critical and popular success writing film screenplays, also moving into television in the 1980s and 1990s. His feature film projects included The Osterman Weekend (1982), Rob Roy (1995) and Dean Spanley (2008).
Sharp married four times and had a total of six children
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Sharp

John Robinson Imrie

  • Person
  • 1914-2000
John Robinson Imrie was born in Wormit on Tay , attending secondary school at Harris Academy. He resided at Hawkhill Place while he studied medicine at University College Dundee, which his brother had also attended and qualified from.
Graduating in 1937, he worked as a Senior House Officer at Harrogate Hospital, moving on to work as a ships surgeon. Returning from this post, he worked at Torbay Hospital before joining the Royal Army Medial Corps. In this post he served in India and the Middle East, reaching the rank of Major.
After the war, Imrie joined with Dr. Venn-Dunn in General Practice in Torquay, now the medical centre at St. Marys. He was also clinical assistant in the Geriatric department at Paignton Hospital, and Newton Abbot Hospital. He was involved in founding Lily Derry Day Hospital at Torbay, and was medical officer to both the Post Office and the Territorial Army.

George Mason

  • Person
  • 1945-
George Mason was an employee of Timex Electronics group, employed in their manufacturing plant in Dundee during the Timex dispute. The Timex corporation had been a major employer within the city for a number of decades when, in the early 1980s, citing difficulties with competing with cheaper workforces and production costs in the Far East, the company attempted to streamline the plant. This streamlining took the form of attempting to cut wages and employee numbers, which led to a dispute with the workers and their Union. This dispute resulted in mass demonstrations, picket lines, clashes with police, a large number of redundancies, and the bringing in of replacement workers to take the place of those sacked and picketing, before ultimately resulting in the closure of the plant and Timex withdrawing from Dundee in 1993. During this time period George Mason was an active member of the union, and had his employment terminated for taking part in the picketing.
George Mason is currently (2006) a janitor at the University of Dundee.

Club 66

  • Corporate body
  • 1966-
The Club is made up of members who were medical students and qualified in 1966 from Queen's College, Dundee. It was formed to organise student reunions

Professor Alan Chalmers Lendrum

  • Person
  • 1907-1994
AC Lendrum was born in Midlothian and brought up in Brechin. He was educated at Glasgow High School and Ardrossan Academy then attended Glasgow University from where he graduated MA, MD and BSc.
In 1933 he was appointed assistant to Sir Robert Muir at Western Infirmary, Glasgow, and later became a lecturer in pathology at Glasgow University. From 1947 to 1967 Lendrum was professor of pathology at St Andrews University and became professor at Dundee when the University was created there in 1967.
Lendrum served on several boards and committees in the University until he retired in 1972. Lendrum was a well respected academic and was visiting professor at Yale in 1960. His experiments with staining tissues, in particular, made a significant contribution to the scientific study of disease. An interest in technical matters led to his honorary membership and presidency of the Institute of Medical Laboratory Sciences. A member of many national and international organisations, he was a Founder Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists.
After his retiral he moved with his wife, Elizabeth, to Cumbria. He died in 1994 at the age of eighty-seven and was survived by his second wife, Dr Ann Sandison.

Dr Don Carney

  • Person
  • ff 2003-2006
Carney was the first to receive a PhD by public output. His research specialism is the Doric dialect of NE Scotland. He has contributed to television programmes in the UK and the US. He is currently (2006) a lecturer on Hotel Tourism and Retail Management at Robert Gordon University.

Ninewells Hospital and Medical School

  • Corporate body
  • 1973-
The foundation stone for Ninewells was laid by Lord Hughes of Hawkhill on 9th September 1965. The hospital was officially opened by the Queen Mother on 23rd October 1974. The buildings at Ninewells, from the Dundee College of Nursing to the Maternity Department stand on a sloping parkland site with views across the River Tay. Ward units were planned on the 'race-track' principle, each unit having 48 beds in two wards of 24 beds. Ninewells was built to accommodate 800 beds and a staff of around 4,000.
The medical school was ranked 1st in the UK in 2009. The hospital has nursing and research links with the University of Dundee and is managed by NHS Tayside. The associated Medical School is a centre for research and the combined complex is the largest in the U.K.

Robert N.M. Robertson

  • Person
  • 15 March 1915-6 February 1991
Robertson was born in Canada and grew up in Rothsey. He attended Glasgow University as a law student and later served with the army in India and took part in the Normandy landing during the Second World War.
He was appointed as an administrator to the Medical School at St Andrews in 1945 and later left to become the Secretary of the University of Southampton. He became Secretary and Registrar of Queen’s College, Dundee in 1966 and continued as Secretary of the University of Dundee from its foundation in 1967 until 1973. It is recognised that he played a major role in its development during the 20th century.

Professor G. P. Henderson

  • Person
Professor G. P. Henderson was a lecturer in the department of Philosophy at the University of Dundee and the editor of the publication- The Philisophical Quarterly

Jan Walis

  • Person
  • 1908-1987
Jan Walis was a Polish soldier who settled in Scotland after the Second World War. He returned to his roots in farming, founding an agricultural college in Findo Gask in the late 1940s before retiring to Montrose, where he died.

Roger Leitch

  • Person
  • 195? -
Ethnologist Roger Leitch started making fieldwork recordings as an undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh in the early 1980s. As a graduate, he worked with the School of Scottish Studies. He has recorded and transcribed interviews with people living in the Highlands and Islands, people involved in seasonal work and the travelling community

Dr James Rorie

  • Person
  • 1838-1911
James Rorie was 4 April 1838 in Arbroath and educated at Arbroath Academy. In 1855 he began studying at Edinburgh University as a medical student graduating in 1859 as a Doctor of Medicine. In the same year he also received a diploma from the Royal College of Surgeons. He then began working in the old Dundee Asylum and was appointed Superintendent in 1860. Throughout his life Dr Rorie was an important member of the Glasite Church and in 1872 married Margaret Baxter with whom he raised a family. He was later involved in the building of the new asylum at Westgreen, Liff which eventually became the Royal Dundee Liff Hospital. In 1891 Dr Rorie was appointed lecturer on Mental Diseases in the Medical Department at Dundee University College. He died in 1911.

School of Life Sciences

  • Corporate body
  • 2000-
The School of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee was formed in October 2000 from the Departments of Anatomy and Physiology, Biochemistry, Biological Sciences and Chemistry. These Departments were dissolved and replaced by eight Research Divisions and a Teaching Unit. The School is housed in five buildings on the University Campus, namely the Wellcome Trust Biocentre (WTB), the Medical Sciences Institute (MSI), the Biological Sciences Institute (BSI), the Old Medical School (OMS) and the Carnelley Building. Completed in 1997, the WTB is the most recent addition, being built and equipped with donations totalling nearly £14 million. This includes £10 million from The Wellcome Trust (thought to be the largest single charitable donation ever given to Scotland). The WTB is physically joined to and fully integrated with the MSI and this research complex houses some 450 scientists and support staff. A further 200 Scientists are based in BSI, OMS and the Carnelley Building. The School comprises some 70 Research Groups headed by Principal Investigators (PIs) that include citizens of Austria, Britain, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Japan, and the USA, and scientists from 52 different nations work in the School. Many of the PIs have been awarded prestigious Research Fellowships and a host of National and International Research Prizes. Current research grants awarded from non-University sources are £23 million per annum mainly from the Wellcome Trust, the UK Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, the National Environmental Research Council, The Royal Society of London and a number of Pharmaceutical companies. The eight Research Divisions of the School are Biological Chemistry and Molecular Microbiology, Cell Biology and Immunology, Cell and Developmental Biology, Cell Signalling, Environmental and Applied Biology, Gene Regulation and Expression, Molecular Physiology and Physical and Inorganic Chemistry. They carry out fundamental research into many of the most topical areas of current biomedical and life sciences research, and their work is aimed at understanding the causes of diseases that include diabetes, cancer, hereditary skin diseases, inflammatory diseases, defects of the immune system, antibiotic resistance in bacteria and tropical parasitic diseases.

Paul Herbert

  • Person
  • ff 1998
Herbert was a history student at Dundee University. In 1998 he attended the Sources and Methods class in the Archives.

University of Dundee Ladies' Club

  • Corporate body
  • 1928-
The University of Dundee Ladies' Club held its inaugral meeting on 25 October 1928. Originally known as Dundee University College Tea Club it was later known as Queen's College Ladies' Tea Club. Formed for the relatives and wives of University staff the club organised social events, talks and lectures. In 2003 it celebrated its 75th anniversary.

Development Office

  • Corporate body
  • 1990s-2003
During the 1990s the Development Office was based in Cross Row and promoted the University. It included within its sphere the Alumni Office and Appeals and Campaigns. In 2003 the Development Office became External Relations and moved to the Tower. Alumni Relations remained part of the department but remained in Cross Row. It became the Alumni and Development Office in 2007 after combining with Trusts & Foundations fundraising as well as specific campaigns - Diabetes Research etc. The Press Office and Student Recruitment and Admissions also became part of External Relations.

University Of Dundee, Alumni & Development

  • Corporate body
The Alumni & Development office helps alumni stay in touch with one another and with the University. It is in contact with nearly 60,000 Dundee graduates in more than 100 countries. The alumni support the University in many ways, from generously donating their time and expertise to making gifts, which change lives and this can all be done through Dundee-Reunited.

Sunnyside Royal Hospital

  • Corporate body
  • 1781-2011
The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was founded in 1781 by Mrs. Susan Carnegie of Charleton for the treatment of private and pauper patients, and was the first mental hospital in Scotland. It was built on the Montrose Links on a site bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road and was granted a Royal Charter in 1810.
A new improved Asylum with better facilities was completed in 1858, situated on lands of Sunnyside farm, in the village of Hillside, on the outskirts of Montrose. Carnegie House was built for private patients in 1899. In 1913 the Royal Charter was amended, after which it was renamed the Royal Asylum of Montrose and that part of the Institution which consisted of the Infirmary and Dispensary was disjoined and received its own Royal Charter.
However, overcrowding was a problem with patient numbers reaching 670 by 1900, precipitating the need for further accommodation. As a result, Howden Villa was completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa was completed in 1904. Westmount Cottages were built in 1905 to house the extra staff required to care of the additional patients. The lease of Sunnyside Farm expired in 1911 and over 52 acres were purchased for the sum of £4500. Angus House was built in 1939 to accommodate elderly patients suffering from dementia.
With the advent of the National Health Service in 1948, the Asylum was renamed the Royal Mental Hospital of Montrose and came under the jurisdiction of the Eastern Regional Hospital Board. It was again renamed in 1962, when it became Sunnyside Royal Hospital. When Sunnyside celebrated its bicentenary in 1981, the number of patients was approximately 400. The hospital closed in 2011. Many of its patients and functions were transferred to the newly opened Susan Carnegie Centre at Stracathro Hospital, Angus.

Sidlaw Industries Ltd

  • Corporate body
  • 1920-
Jute Industries Ltd was formed as a result of the amalgamation of many of the Dundee jute companies including Cox Brothers (Camperdown Works), Gilroy and Sons (Tay Works) and J and A D Grimond (Bowbridge Works), and was registered as a limited company in England in 1920.
It changed its name to Sidlaw Industries Ltd in 1971 and to Sidlaw Group plc in 1981. Over the years the company moved away from jute into other interests. As of 2020 the company is still registered as active and is based in Bristol.

Neil Stewart and William Tennant Gairdner

  • Person
  • 1814-1907

Neil Stewart (1814-1875) was primarily a Botanist and was a member of many learned societies, including the Botanical Society of Edinburgh and excelled as a botanical draughtsman in the illustration of natural history subjects. He executed a large number of botanical drawings for the Botanical classes in the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh and for a number of years was the elected artist to the Botanical Society of Edinburgh, of which he became an Associate in 1850.

William Tennant Gairdner (1824-1907) studied medicine at Edinburgh in the 1840's, gaining good reports and coming to work in Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. Gairdner applied for the post of pathologist to the ERI in 1848. This meant he became responsible for the "Edinburgh Pathology Register", a series of large leather bound volumes that recorded the findings from every post-mortem examination. Throughout his career he progressed rapidly, from Clerk to Infirmary Pathologist and finally, to Physician. His last appointment was to the Chair of Medicine at Glasgow University, and it was while in this position that he received his Knighthood.

Eddie Small

  • Person
  • 1951-2020

Eddie was a historian, playwright, Creative Writing tutor and Public Engagement Officer for the University of Dundee's School of Humanities. He was a well-known face in Dundee literary circles and wrote the play 'The Four Marys' as well as the books 'Mary Lily Walker: The Forgotten Visionary of Dundee' and 'To Bodies Gone', the latter of which saw Eddie research the history of death in Scotland, with an emphasis on practices and rituals surrounding bereavement. He twice won the Stephen Fry award for public engagement, and was voted the 2016 Inspirational Teaching Award winner by the University’s student body. He was also well-known for his very popular tours of the city.
Eddie was born at Dundee Royal Infirmary, grew up in Kirkton and attended West March Primary School and Kirkton High. He had a variety of jobs before gaining his degree and joining the University of Dundee

Sources:
https://www.dundee.ac.uk/stories/eddie-small-memoriam
https://www.eveningtelegraph.co.uk/fp/tributes-flood-in-for-one-of-the-citys-great-sons-eddie-small/

Anatole De Grunwald; Alex De Grunwald

  • Family
  • 1910-1967, b1940

Anatole De Grunwald (1910-1967) was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia, the son of a diplomat (Constantin de Grunwald) in the service of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. He was seven years old when his father was forced to flee with his family to France during the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Growing up in France and England, he studied at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where he edited a student magazine, The Europa, and attended the University of Paris (Sorbonne).
Anatole started his career in films by reading scripts for Gaumont-British. He then turned to screenwriting in 1939 for the British film industry and eventually became a producer. Anatole was appointed managing director of Two Cities Films, and later formed his own production company with his brother, Dimitri de Grunwald in 1946.
De Grunwald contributed to the scripts of many of his productions, including The Winslow Boy (1948) and The Holly and the Ivy (1952). Most of his films were British productions, although in the 1960s, invited by MGM, he went to the United States where he produced several films, then returned to England for the remainder of his career. Anatole de Grunwald's final films included The V.I.P.s (1963) and The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1965). He worked in close collaboration with the director Anthony Asquith and the dramatist Terence Rattigan, with whom he made many films.

Alexander De Grunwald (b 1944), son of Anatole, worked mainly on the production side of film, most notably as production manager on Flash Gordon, Ghandi, East is East and Marigold

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatole_de_Grunwald

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