Showing 33 results

Names
Person

William Fraser Mitchell

  • Person
  • 9 April 1900 -
William Fraser Mitchell was born in Monifieth, Angus, the only son of William Fraser Mitchell and Jane Lawson.
He was a descendant of William Watson, linen weaver, St Vigeans, who was also the great grandfather of Sir Robert Alexander Watson Watt (1892- ), inventor of the radar.
William Fraser first compiled his family history in 1940. This material relates mainly to his mother's family.

Arthur Dawson Foote

  • Person
  • 1931-

A. D. Foote was born in Toxteth and educated in Manchester from 1938 and at Balliol College, Oxford, from 1949 where he read Classics and English.

Foote suffered from schizophrenia from the age of 26. After he recovered from an illness he spent some years as Warden of the International Voluntary Service Centre in London. To get a quieter job he worked at the National Central Library in Malet Place till 1965.

In 1969 he moved to Dundee where his family stayed; he had to spend the first 5 years in hospital. There, he edited a quarterly magazine for the patients which ran up to 22 issues.

A. D. Foote has been writing poetry and short stories as a vocation, and from 1985 earning income as a translator. He speaks Finnish, Polish, Hungarian, Cornish, Arabic, Ido and Interlingua.

Kate Stewart Fraser

  • Person
  • 1886-1974

Kate Stewart Fraser was born in Annfield Street, Dundee, the daughter of John Fraser. She was educated at Morgan Academy and Harris Academy and then University College, Dundee (which she attended 1905-1910) and was awarded an honours MA by the University of St Andrews in 1909. She had served as a pupil teacher at Hill Street School and later taught at Harris Academy, Dundee.

During the Great War Kate emigrated to Canada where she married her fiancé Thomas Willock (Tom) Scott, an accountant from Wormit. They had two children Kathryn, known as Kay, a French teacher, and Thomas Stewart, known as Stewart. Stewart Scott also became a teacher and died on 29th March 2006 in Toronto. He was survived by his second wife Maia and his three children.

Kate died in Toronto.

George Taylor and Margaret Corstorphine

  • Person
  • 1904-1993

George Taylor was born in Edinburgh and educated at Edinburgh University where he gained a degree in Botany. Leaving his post-graduate employment at the Royal Botanical Garden, Taylor moved south to establish the botanical section within the British Museum. In 1956 he was appointed the director of the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew and gained a knighthood in 1962. As well as his official career he travelled widely in China, Asia and Africa on plant collecting expeditions and had a special interest in the Himalayan poppy.

Robert Henry and Margaret Corstorphine were keen amateur botanists from Arbroath who dedicated their talents to studying the flora of the county of Angus. Over a forty-year period lasting into the early 1940s they amassed a comprehensive Herbarium and botanical library and were also engaged in the compilation of a manuscript survey of the flora of Angus, which was intended for publication. Taylor became closely involved with the Flora of Angus after the death of Robert Corstorphine. Margaret Corstorphine welcomed his assistance as her poor health left her unable to continue with the work alone.

John Iball

  • Person
  • 1907-21 January 1993

John Iball was born in Hasland, Derbyshire. He attended University College, Bangor from where he graduated with a first class degree in physics in 1928.

After a year doing a teaching diploma, he took an MSc in 1930 and a PhD in 1932 in the study of crystal structures by X-ray. Iball then went to the Royal Institution in London where he worked under Sir William Bragg focusing on X-ray studies of organic compounds. This led him to study the molecular structure of cancer producing aromatic compounds and to an interest in carcinogenicity.

He joined the research staff of the Royal Cancer Hospital in London in 1934 and his contribution was recognised by the award of a DSc (Wales) in 1939. The following year Iball joined the team working on rocket science for the Ministry of Supply then, after the war, moved to Port Sunlight to work for Unilever.

In 1948 he was appointed a fellow at University College, Dundee where he was to remain until he retired. He lectured in the physics and chemistry departments and in 1969 was appointed Senior Gibb Fellow of the British Empire Cancer Campaign.

Iball was keen to share his enthusiasm for science with people outside the academic community. He formed the Tayside and Fife Branch of the British Association and was always willing to help local industries with scientific problems. After he retired in 1974 he continued to be active in these areas and to publish the results of his ongoing research. Iball died in Dundee.

James F. Riley

  • Person
  • 1912-1985
Dr James F. Riley was born in Settle, Yorkshire. He studied medicine at Edinburgh University, where he graduated with Honours in 1935, obtaining his F.R.C.S.E. in 1938.
From 1939 to 1944 he was an assistant surgeon in the Scottish Emergency Medical Service, and later served as a surgical specialist commanding a mobile surgical unit in the Far East. On returning, he wrote his M.D. thesis "Experiments in Carcinogenesis 1939-1944".
In 1948 he obtained the Diploma in Medical Radiotherapy and was appointed as Consultant Radiotherapist at Dundee Royal Infirmary, and in 1950 became a reader in the Department of Radiotherapy.
From 1975-1977 Riley was a research fellow at The University of Dundee. Dr Riley's research was devoted to the study of the Mast Cell, discovering the origin of histamine, work that has stimulated further research world-wide.
Recognising his international significance, Dr Riley was appointed as a visiting Professor at the University of Montreal where he was awarded the Claude Bernard Medal, as well as being elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Robert H S Robertson

  • Person
  • 17 June 1911-7 July 1999
Robert Hugh Stannus Robertson FGS FRSE was a 20th-century Scottish chemist and authority on clay minerals.
He was born in Greenwich east of London, the son of Sir Robert Robertson and educated at Rugby School. He then studied Chemistry at Cambridge University graduating MA around 1930. On graduating he spent some time mapping Dicksonland in Spitzbergen where the glacier Robertsonbreen is named after him.
In 1933 he became the Chief Chemist at Fullers Earth Union Ltd in Surrey then in 1944 moved to Glasgow. In 1958 Robertson moved to Pitlochry where he lived for the rest of his life. His field work was varied and worldwide, including, field work in Iran (Kermanshah, Spain, Greece, and the US, and the United Kingdom.
In 1969 he founded the Robertson Resource Use Institute in Pitlochry and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh a year later.

Dr William Maxwell Jamieson

  • Person
  • ?- August 1994
Dr William Maxwell Jamieson O.B.E., M.D., F.R.C.P. (Ed.), F.F.C.M., D.P.H., took up duty as Senior R.M.O. at King's Cross Hospital, Dundee, in 1939, and apart from service with the R.A.F., 1944-1947, he stayed there until his retirement in 1979. He had been promoted to Physician Superintendent in 1948, and also headed the University's Department of Communicable (Infectious) Diseases. He headed the organising committee for the centenary celebrations of Dundee Medical School in 1987.

Alan Sharp

  • Person
  • 1934-2013

Born in Alyth, Sharp was adopted and raised in Greenock. Leaving school at 14 Sharp did a variety of jobs before moving to London with the intention of writing.

In 1965, his screenplay 'A Knight in Tarnished Armour' was broadcast by the BBC. He also published his first novel 'A Green Tree in Gedd'e', which won the Scottish Arts Council Award in 1967, the same year he published 'The Wind Shifts'.

Sharp emigrated to the USA where he found critical and popular success writing film screenplays, also moving into television in the 1980s and 1990s. His feature film projects included The Osterman Weekend (1982), Rob Roy (1995) and Dean Spanley (2008).
Sharp married four times and had a total of six children

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Sharp

Henry David Buist

  • Person
  • ?-1972

Henry David Buist served an engineering apprenticeship then went to India where he was a factory manager for National Company Ltd in Rajgunge for 33 years. He managed the Orient, Budge and National Jute Mills. In 1935 he was appointed a Magistrate of the Third Class in the district of Howrah.

Buist's family lived at Dalmeny Place, 1 Morgan Street, Dundee and would holiday in India. Buist and his wife had two daughters; the elder, Ina, was regularly sent postcards from India by her father and by his brother, William. Their youngest child, Henry, was drowned when his ship was torpedoed off Norway in the early months of WW2.

HD Buist retired from working in India in February 1942. His wife died in 1963, and Buist himself died at his home, 27 Oxford Street, Dundee in February 1972.
Source: The Courier & Advertiser, February 29, 1972

Johnston Forbes-Roberston

  • Person
  • 1853-1937
Johnston Forbes-Roberston was an English actor whose portrayal of Hamlet was considered by many, including Bernard Shaw, to be the finest of his generation, and he wrote the part of Caesar in 'Caesar and Cleopatra' specifically for Forbes-Roberston, with the part of Cleopatra played by Gertrude Elliott, who was also Forbes-Robertson's wife. Forbes-Robertson had previously toured Shaw's play 'The Devil's Disciple' in the lead role. Forbes-Robertson also brought 'Caesar and Cleopatra' to the Shubert Theatre in New York in 1913, as manager of Forbes-Robertson Repertory.

George Bernard Shaw

  • Person
  • 1854 -1950
George Bernard Shaw was a Dublin born, Nobel prize winning playwright and critic. His plays include 'Major Barbara', 'The Doctor's Dilemma', 'Caesar and Cleopatra', 'Pygmalion', and 'Saint Joan'. He was also a prolific letter writer.

James Hamilton Gray

  • Person
  • 1902-?
James Hamilton Gray was the son of David Dargie Gray, station master at West Ferry Station, Broughty Ferry, and his wife, Mary Brown Robertson. James attended the Eastern School, Broughty Ferry where he received the Dux Price for General Excellence in June 1915. From there he went on to Harris Academy in Dundee and then Dundee Technical College where between 1917 and 1921 he received Class Certificates in Jute Manufacturing and also in 1921 a qualification in Home and Foreign Trade from Dundee Chamber of Commerce. While he was studying he was working at David Low and Company at Ann Street Works, Dundee; he worked there until March 6 1922.
By 1923 he was in India and from January 1923 to March 1947 he was employed by the Barnagore Factory and the Bally Jute Co., Ltd. In March he was promoted to the executive staff of Jardine Henderson Ltd where he remained until his retirement in 1956.
During his first year in India he was ill; there are no specific details about the illness though a letter he wrote suggests he had been ill for 7 weeks. In the same year he enrolled with The Cossipore Artillery. Between 1930 and 1932 he passed examinations in Hindustani and Bengali. According to his niece, he was also an arbitrator of the Bengal Chamber of Commerce and a commissioner of the Barnigore Municipality, under British Rule.
In 1950 he married Margery Strachan Ross at St Andrew's, Church of Scotland, Calcutta and on his retirement in 1956 he and his wife returned to Broughty Ferry.

John Robinson Imrie

  • Person
  • 1914-2000
John Robinson Imrie was born in Wormit on Tay , attending secondary school at Harris Academy. He resided at Hawkhill Place while he studied medicine at University College Dundee, which his brother had also attended and qualified from.
Graduating in 1937, he worked as a Senior House Officer at Harrogate Hospital, moving on to work as a ships surgeon. Returning from this post, he worked at Torbay Hospital before joining the Royal Army Medial Corps. In this post he served in India and the Middle East, reaching the rank of Major.
After the war, Imrie joined with Dr. Venn-Dunn in General Practice in Torquay, now the medical centre at St. Marys. He was also clinical assistant in the Geriatric department at Paignton Hospital, and Newton Abbot Hospital. He was involved in founding Lily Derry Day Hospital at Torbay, and was medical officer to both the Post Office and the Territorial Army.

George Mason

  • Person
  • 1945-
George Mason was an employee of Timex Electronics group, employed in their manufacturing plant in Dundee during the Timex dispute. The Timex corporation had been a major employer within the city for a number of decades when, in the early 1980s, citing difficulties with competing with cheaper workforces and production costs in the Far East, the company attempted to streamline the plant. This streamlining took the form of attempting to cut wages and employee numbers, which led to a dispute with the workers and their Union. This dispute resulted in mass demonstrations, picket lines, clashes with police, a large number of redundancies, and the bringing in of replacement workers to take the place of those sacked and picketing, before ultimately resulting in the closure of the plant and Timex withdrawing from Dundee in 1993. During this time period George Mason was an active member of the union, and had his employment terminated for taking part in the picketing.
George Mason is currently (2006) a janitor at the University of Dundee.

Professor Alan Chalmers Lendrum

  • Person
  • 1907-1994
AC Lendrum was born in Midlothian and brought up in Brechin. He was educated at Glasgow High School and Ardrossan Academy then attended Glasgow University from where he graduated MA, MD and BSc.
In 1933 he was appointed assistant to Sir Robert Muir at Western Infirmary, Glasgow, and later became a lecturer in pathology at Glasgow University. From 1947 to 1967 Lendrum was professor of pathology at St Andrews University and became professor at Dundee when the University was created there in 1967.
Lendrum served on several boards and committees in the University until he retired in 1972. Lendrum was a well respected academic and was visiting professor at Yale in 1960. His experiments with staining tissues, in particular, made a significant contribution to the scientific study of disease. An interest in technical matters led to his honorary membership and presidency of the Institute of Medical Laboratory Sciences. A member of many national and international organisations, he was a Founder Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists.
After his retiral he moved with his wife, Elizabeth, to Cumbria. He died in 1994 at the age of eighty-seven and was survived by his second wife, Dr Ann Sandison.

Dr Don Carney

  • Person
  • ff 2003-2006
Carney was the first to receive a PhD by public output. His research specialism is the Doric dialect of NE Scotland. He has contributed to television programmes in the UK and the US. He is currently (2006) a lecturer on Hotel Tourism and Retail Management at Robert Gordon University.

Robert N.M. Robertson

  • Person
  • 15 March 1915-6 February 1991
Robertson was born in Canada and grew up in Rothsey. He attended Glasgow University as a law student and later served with the army in India and took part in the Normandy landing during the Second World War.
He was appointed as an administrator to the Medical School at St Andrews in 1945 and later left to become the Secretary of the University of Southampton. He became Secretary and Registrar of Queen’s College, Dundee in 1966 and continued as Secretary of the University of Dundee from its foundation in 1967 until 1973. It is recognised that he played a major role in its development during the 20th century.

Professor G. P. Henderson

  • Person
Professor G. P. Henderson was a lecturer in the department of Philosophy at the University of Dundee and the editor of the publication- The Philisophical Quarterly

Jan Walis

  • Person
  • 1908-1987
Jan Walis was a Polish soldier who settled in Scotland after the Second World War. He returned to his roots in farming, founding an agricultural college in Findo Gask in the late 1940s before retiring to Montrose, where he died.

Roger Leitch

  • Person
  • 195? -
Ethnologist Roger Leitch started making fieldwork recordings as an undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh in the early 1980s. As a graduate, he worked with the School of Scottish Studies. He has recorded and transcribed interviews with people living in the Highlands and Islands, people involved in seasonal work and the travelling community

Dr James Rorie

  • Person
  • 1838-1911
James Rorie was 4 April 1838 in Arbroath and educated at Arbroath Academy. In 1855 he began studying at Edinburgh University as a medical student graduating in 1859 as a Doctor of Medicine. In the same year he also received a diploma from the Royal College of Surgeons. He then began working in the old Dundee Asylum and was appointed Superintendent in 1860. Throughout his life Dr Rorie was an important member of the Glasite Church and in 1872 married Margaret Baxter with whom he raised a family. He was later involved in the building of the new asylum at Westgreen, Liff which eventually became the Royal Dundee Liff Hospital. In 1891 Dr Rorie was appointed lecturer on Mental Diseases in the Medical Department at Dundee University College. He died in 1911.

Paul Herbert

  • Person
  • ff 1998
Herbert was a history student at Dundee University. In 1998 he attended the Sources and Methods class in the Archives.

Neil Stewart and William Tennant Gairdner

  • Person
  • 1814-1907

Neil Stewart (1814-1875) was primarily a Botanist and was a member of many learned societies, including the Botanical Society of Edinburgh and excelled as a botanical draughtsman in the illustration of natural history subjects. He executed a large number of botanical drawings for the Botanical classes in the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh and for a number of years was the elected artist to the Botanical Society of Edinburgh, of which he became an Associate in 1850.

William Tennant Gairdner (1824-1907) studied medicine at Edinburgh in the 1840's, gaining good reports and coming to work in Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. Gairdner applied for the post of pathologist to the ERI in 1848. This meant he became responsible for the "Edinburgh Pathology Register", a series of large leather bound volumes that recorded the findings from every post-mortem examination. Throughout his career he progressed rapidly, from Clerk to Infirmary Pathologist and finally, to Physician. His last appointment was to the Chair of Medicine at Glasgow University, and it was while in this position that he received his Knighthood.

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